Integrating human indoor air pollutant exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_45CDAB30FB47
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Integrating human indoor air pollutant exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment.
Périodique
Environmental Science and Technology
Auteur(s)
Hellweg S., Demou E., Bruzzi R., Meijer A., Rosenbaum R.K., Huijbregts M.A., Mckone T.E.
ISSN
0013-936X (Print)
ISSN-L
0013-936X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
43
Numéro
6
Pages
1670-1679
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers' or consumers' health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/ SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.
Mots-clé
Air Pollution, Indoor/analysis, Environmental Exposure/adverse effects, Environmental Exposure/analysis, Humans, Models, Theoretical
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/01/2010 18:30
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 17:54
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