Music and felt emotions: how systematic pitch level variations affect the experience of pleasantness and arousal

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 2014_Jaquet_Music_PsycholMusic_postprint.pdf (488.14 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_454E3443C332
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Music and felt emotions: how systematic pitch level variations affect the experience of pleasantness and arousal
Périodique
Psychology of Music
Auteur(s)
Jaquet Lucas, Danuser Brigitta, Gomez Patrick
ISSN
0305-7356
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
42
Numéro
1
Pages
51-70
Langue
anglais
Notes
Indexé dans WoS mais pas dans Pubmed /AS
Résumé
Pitch is a fundamental musical factor; however, findings about its contribution to the elicitation of emotions are contradictory. The purpose of this work was to assess the effect of systematic pitch variations on self-reports of felt valence and arousal. In a within-subject design, 49 subjects listened to four 1-minute classical piano excerpts, each presented at three different pitch levels (one octave lower than the original version, the original version and one octave higher than the original version). Compared to excerpts both without octave modification and in the +1 octave variant, pleasantness of excerpts in the -1 octave variant was significantly lower. This main effect was stronger for women than men and, importantly, was modulated by the specific characteristics of the stimuli. There was also a significant, yet smaller, negative relationship between pitch level and arousal, moderated by gender: Compared to higher pitch, lower pitch was associated with higher arousal in men only. Regarding the complex outcomes of this study, future studies should investigate to which extent our findings can be generalized to other musical works. The ultimate goal might be to demonstrate how pitch level interacts with other musical features and listeners' characteristics in eliciting diverse affective experiences.
Mots-clé
Music, Emotions, Arousal, Galvanic Skin Response, Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena, Sex Factors,
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
31/01/2013 13:08
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 17:53
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