Increased audiovisual integration in cochlear-implanted deaf patients: independent components analysis of longitudinal positron emission tomography data.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_44D1F0BE136D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Increased audiovisual integration in cochlear-implanted deaf patients: independent components analysis of longitudinal positron emission tomography data.
Périodique
European Journal of Neuroscience
Auteur(s)
Strelnikov K., Rouger J., Lagleyre S., Fraysse B., Démonet J.F., Déguine O., Barone P.
ISSN
1460-9568 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0953-816X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
41
Numéro
5
Pages
677-685
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
It has been demonstrated in earlier studies that patients with a cochlear implant have increased abilities for audio-visual integration because the crude information transmitted by the cochlear implant requires the persistent use of the complementary speech information from the visual channel. The brain network for these abilities needs to be clarified. We used an independent components analysis (ICA) of the activation (H2 (15) O) positron emission tomography data to explore occipito-temporal brain activity in post-lingually deaf patients with unilaterally implanted cochlear implants at several months post-implantation (T1), shortly after implantation (T0) and in normal hearing controls. In between-group analysis, patients at T1 had greater blood flow in the left middle temporal cortex as compared with T0 and normal hearing controls. In within-group analysis, patients at T0 had a task-related ICA component in the visual cortex, and patients at T1 had one task-related ICA component in the left middle temporal cortex and the other in the visual cortex. The time courses of temporal and visual activities during the positron emission tomography examination at T1 were highly correlated, meaning that synchronized integrative activity occurred. The greater involvement of the visual cortex and its close coupling with the temporal cortex at T1 confirm the importance of audio-visual integration in more experienced cochlear implant subjects at the cortical level.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
02/04/2015 20:28
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:44
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