Alternative reproductive tactics and reproductive success in male Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat).

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_436D2947ABD5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Alternative reproductive tactics and reproductive success in male Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat).
Périodique
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Fasel N., Saladin V., Richner H.
ISSN
1420-9101 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1010-061X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Numéro
11
Pages
2242-2255
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The use of alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) is widespread in animals. Males of some species may change tactics depending on age, body condition and social environment. Many bat species are polygynous where a fraction of males only have access to fertile females. For polygynous bats, knowledge of the reproductive success of males using different ARTs is scarce, and it remains unclear how age of males is related to switching decisions between social statuses. We studied a large captive population of Carollia perspicillata, where males are either harem holders, bachelors or peripheral males. Using a multistate procedure, we modelled the age-related switches in reproductive tactics and in survival probability. From the model, we calculated the reproductive success and the frequencies of males displaying different reproductive tactics. As in mammals, the switch between social statuses is often related to age, we predicted that the transition probability of bachelor and peripheral males to harem status would increase with age. We show, however, that social status transition towards a harem holding position was not related to age. Reproductive success changed with age and social status. Harem males had a significantly higher reproductive success than bachelor males except between a short period from 3.8 to 4.4 years of age where success was similar, and a significantly higher reproductive success than peripheral males between 2.6 and 4.4 years of age. Harem males showed a clear decrease in the probability of maintaining social status with age, which suggests that senescence reduces resource holding potential.

Mots-clé
age estimation, alternative reproductive tactics, bats, Carollia perspicillata, multistate model, Phyllostomidae, reproductive success
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
29/11/2016 15:58
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 17:47
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