Epigenetics in Cardiovascular Regulation.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_42EE1C8F0858
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Epigenetics in Cardiovascular Regulation.
Périodique
Advances In Experimental Medicine and Biology
Auteur(s)
Sartori C., Rimoldi S.F., Rexhaj E., Allemann Y., Scherrer U.
ISSN
0065-2598 (Print)
ISSN-L
0065-2598
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
903
Pages
55-62
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Epidemiological studies have shown an association between pathologic events occurring during early life and the development of cardiovascular and metabolic disease in adulthood. These observations have led to the so-called fetal programming of adult disease hypothesis. In line with this hypothesis, short-term exposure to hypoxia after birth predisposes to exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction later in life in rats, and transient perinatal hypoxia predisposes to exaggerated pulmonary hypertension during short-term exposure to high altitude in humans. Along the same lines, in recent studies in Bolivian high-altitude dwellers, we found that preeclampsia predisposes the offspring to pulmonary and systemic endothelial dysfunction possibly related to impaired NO bioavailability and augmented oxidative stress. Very recent data from our lab suggest that assisted reproductive technologies may represent another important example consistent with this hypothesis. The mechanisms underpinning the developmental origin of this vascular dysfunction are poorly understood. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations, such as DNA methylation or histone acetylation may play a role.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
01/07/2016 10:48
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:39
Données d'usage