Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon Leads to Acute but Transient Increase in Cerebral Water Diffusivity and Plasma Biomarkers Levels Changes.

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_41780B83A8DB
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon Leads to Acute but Transient Increase in Cerebral Water Diffusivity and Plasma Biomarkers Levels Changes.
Périodique
Frontiers in physiology
Auteur(s)
Zanchi D., Viallon M., Le Goff C., Millet G.P., Giardini G., Croisille P., Haller S.
ISSN-L
1664-042X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Pages
664
Langue
anglais
Notes
Zanchi, Davide
Viallon, Magalie
Le Goff, Caroline
Millet, Gregoire P
Giardini, Guido
Croisille, Pierre
Haller, Sven
eng
Switzerland
2017/01/21 06:00
Front Physiol. 2017 Jan 5;7:664. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2016.00664. eCollection 2016.
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Background: Pioneer studies demonstrate the impact of extreme sport load on the human brain, leading to threatening conditions for athlete's health such as cerebral edema. The investigation of brain water diffusivity, allowing the measurement of the intercellular water and the assessment of cerebral edema, can give a great contribution to the investigation of the effects of extreme sports on the brain. We therefore assessed the effect of supra-physiological effort (extreme distance and elevation changes) in mountain ultra-marathons (MUMs) athletes combining for the first time brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood parameters. Methods:This longitudinal study included 19 volunteers (44.2 ± 9.5 years) finishing a MUM (330 km, elevation + 24000 m). Quantitative measurements of brain diffusion-weighted images (DWI) were performed at 3 time-points: Before the race, upon arrival and after 48 h. Multiple blood biomarkers were simultaneously investigated. Data analyses included brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and physiological data comparisons between three time-points. Results:The whole brain ADC significantly increased from baseline to arrival (p = 0.005) and then significantly decreased at recovery (p = 0.005) to lower values than at baseline (p = 0.005). While sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride as well as hematocrit (HCT) changed over time, the serum osmolality remained constant. Significant correlations were found between whole brain ADC changes and osmolality (p = 0.01), cholesterol (p = 0.009), c-reactive protein (p = 0.04), sodium (p = 0.01), and chloride (p = 0.002) plasma level variations. Conclusions:These results suggest the relative increase of the inter-cellular volume upon arrival, and subsequently its reduction to lower values than at baseline, indicating that even after 48 h the brain has not fully recovered to its equilibrium state. Even though serum electrolytes may only indirectly indicate modifications at the brain level due to the blood brain barrier, the results concerning osmolality suggest that body water might directly influence the change in cerebral ADC. These findings establish therefore a direct link between general brain inter-cellular water content and physiological biomarkers modifications produced by extreme sport.

Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
21/01/2017 19:12
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 17:40
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