Hormone factors play a favorable role in female head and neck cancer risk.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_406831BEE16C.pdf (198.75 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_406831BEE16C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Hormone factors play a favorable role in female head and neck cancer risk.
Périodique
Cancer medicine
Auteur(s)
Hashim D., Sartori S., La Vecchia C., Serraino D., Maso L.D., Negri E., Smith E., Levi F., Boccia S., Cadoni G., Luu H.N., Lee Y.A., Hashibe M., Boffetta P.
ISSN
2045-7634 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-7634
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
08/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
6
Numéro
8
Pages
1998-2007
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Due to lower female incidence, estimates of exogenous and endogenous hormonal factors in head and neck cancers (HNCs, comprising cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) among women have been inconsistent and unable to account for key HNC risk factors. We pooled data from 11 studies from Europe, North America, and Japan. Analysis included 1572 HNC female cases and 4343 controls. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. Lower risk was observed in women who used hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (OR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.34-0.77). Pregnancy (OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.42-0.90) and giving birth (OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.38-0.90) at <35 years of age were inversely associated with HNCs. An inverse association with HNC was observed with age at start of HRT use (OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.39-0.90) for each additional 10 years and with duration of use (OR = 0.87; 95% CI: 0.76-0.99 for every 3 years). Exogenous female hormone use is associated with a nearly twofold risk reduction in female HNCs. The lower female HNC incidence may, in part, be explained by endogenous and exogenous estrogen exposures.

Mots-clé
Alcohol Drinking, Case-Control Studies, Female, Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology, Head and Neck Neoplasms/etiology, Hormone Replacement Therapy/adverse effects, Hormones/adverse effects, Hormones/metabolism, Humans, Menopause, Menstrual Cycle, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Reproductive History, Risk, Smoking, Head and neck neoplasms, hormone replacement therapy, mouth neoplasms, reproductive history, women
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
27/07/2017 11:18
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 17:36
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