Clinical significance of periodic limb movements during sleep: the HypnoLaus study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_3EC20DD48291
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Clinical significance of periodic limb movements during sleep: the HypnoLaus study.
Périodique
Sleep medicine
Auteur(s)
Haba-Rubio J., Marti-Soler H., Tobback N., Andries D., Marques-Vidal P., Vollenweider P., Preisig M., Heinzer R.
ISSN
1878-5506 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1389-9457
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
41
Pages
45-50
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) are prevalent in the general population, but their impact on sleep and association with cardiometabolic disorders are a matter of debate.
Data from 2162 participants (51.2% women, mean age 58.4 ± 11.1 years) of the population-based HypnoLaus study (Lausanne, Switzerland) were collected. Subjective sleep complaints and habits were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Participants underwent a full polysomnography (PSG) at home and were evaluated for the presence of hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.
Participants with a PLMS index (PLMSI) > 15/h (28.6% of the sample) had longer subjective sleep latency (18.6 ± 17.2 vs. 16.1 ± 14.3 min, p = 0.014) and duration (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 6.9 ± 1.1 h, p < 0.001) than participants with PLMSI ≤ 15/h. At the PSG, they spent more time in stage N2 sleep (49.0 ± 11.2 vs. 45.5 ± 9.8%, p < 0.001), less in stage N3 (17.6 ± 8.2 vs. 20.6 ± 8.4%, p < 0.001) and in REM sleep (20.3 ± 6.4 vs. 22.4 ± 6.0%, p < 0.001), and exhibited longer REM latency (104.2 ± 70.2 vs. 91.7 ± 58.6 min, p < 0.001) and higher arousal index (26.5 ± 12.3 vs. 19.2 ± 9.7 n/h, p < 0.001). Participants with a PLMSI > 15/h had a lower ESS scores and higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Multivariate analysis adjusting for confounding factors confirmed the independent association of PLMSI > 15/h with subjective sleep latency and duration, and with objective sleep structure disturbances. However, the associations with sleepiness and cardiovascular risk factors disappeared.
In our large middle-age European population-based sample, PLMSI > 15/h was associated with subjective and objective sleep disturbances but not with sleepiness, hypertension, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome.
Mots-clé
Age Factors, Aged, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nocturnal Myoclonus Syndrome/physiopathology, Polysomnography/methods, Sex Factors, Sleep Stages/physiology, Surveys and Questionnaires, Switzerland, Cardiovascular risk factors, Polysomnography, Sleep, Sleepiness
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
16/01/2018 12:43
Dernière modification de la notice
24/09/2019 6:11
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