Selective Deletion of Sodium Salt Taste during Development Leads to Expanded Terminal Fields of Gustatory Nerves in the Adult Mouse Nucleus of the Solitary Tract.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 5_28100747_Postprint.pdf (7188.42 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Document(s) secondaire(s)
Télécharger: 660.full.pdf (2581.22 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_3B8F861D890C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Selective Deletion of Sodium Salt Taste during Development Leads to Expanded Terminal Fields of Gustatory Nerves in the Adult Mouse Nucleus of the Solitary Tract.
Périodique
The Journal of neuroscience
Auteur(s)
Sun C., Hummler E., Hill D.L.
ISSN
1529-2401 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0270-6474
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
18/01/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
37
Numéro
3
Pages
660-672
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Neuronal activity plays a key role in the development of sensory circuits in the mammalian brain. In the gustatory system, experimental manipulations now exist, through genetic manipulations of specific taste transduction processes, to examine how specific taste qualities (i.e., basic tastes) impact the functional and structural development of gustatory circuits. Here, we used a mouse knock-out model in which the transduction component used to discriminate sodium salts from other taste stimuli was deleted in taste bud cells throughout development. We used this model to test the hypothesis that the lack of activity elicited by sodium salt taste impacts the terminal field organization of nerves that carry taste information from taste buds to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) in the medulla. The glossopharyngeal, chorda tympani, and greater superficial petrosal nerves were labeled to examine their terminal fields in adult control mice and in adult mice in which the α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel was conditionally deleted in taste buds (αENaC knockout). The terminal fields of all three nerves in the NST were up to 2.7 times greater in αENaC knock-out mice compared with the respective field volumes in control mice. The shapes of the fields were similar between the two groups; however, the density and spread of labels were greater in αENaC knock-out mice. Overall, our results show that disruption of the afferent taste signal to sodium salts disrupts the normal age-dependent "pruning" of all terminal fields, which could lead to alterations in sensory coding and taste-related behaviors.
Neural activity plays a major role in the development of sensory circuits in the mammalian brain. To date, there has been no direct test of whether taste-elicited neural activity has a role in shaping central gustatory circuits. However, recently developed genetic tools now allow an assessment of how specific taste stimuli, in this case sodium salt taste, play a role in the maturation of the terminal fields in the mouse brainstem. We found that the specific deletion of sodium salt taste during development produced terminal fields in adults that were dramatically larger than in control mice, demonstrating for the first time that sodium salt taste-elicited activity is necessary for the normal maturation of gustatory inputs into the brain.

Mots-clé
Animals, Chorda Tympani Nerve/cytology, Chorda Tympani Nerve/drug effects, Chorda Tympani Nerve/growth & development, Female, Glossopharyngeal Nerve/cytology, Glossopharyngeal Nerve/drug effects, Glossopharyngeal Nerve/growth & development, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Sodium Chloride/administration & dosage, Solitary Nucleus/cytology, Solitary Nucleus/drug effects, Solitary Nucleus/growth & development, Taste/physiology, Taste Buds/drug effects, Taste Buds/physiology, Taste Perception/drug effects, Taste Perception/physiology, ENaC, activity, axons, epithelial sodium channel, knock out, medulla
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
30/01/2017 19:39
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:31
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