Participation in medical activities beyond standard consultations by Swiss general practitioners: a cross-sectional study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_3B714E386F13
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Participation in medical activities beyond standard consultations by Swiss general practitioners: a cross-sectional study.
Périodique
BMC family practice
Auteur(s)
Jakob J., Cohidon C., Cornuz J., Selby K.
ISSN
1471-2296 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2296
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/05/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Numéro
1
Pages
52
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Few data exist to support the observation that general practitioners (GPs) occupy many important positions in our communities or to characterize which GPs devote more of their time to such activities. We sought to characterize community-based complementary medical activities performed by GPs in the canton Vaud, Switzerland.
All GPs in a region were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study (n = 600) examining engagement in complementary activities beyond standard ambulatory consultations. Categories included teaching, care giving in specific structures, roles as medical experts or company doctors, community care giving, and others completed by the GP. GPs were asked the number of hours devoted monthly to each activity and whether or not they are remunerated for this work.
One hundred and sixty-eight GPs responded (28%), with 149 (92%) reporting that they were engaged in at least one activity beyond their in-office consultations, including 117 (72%) in community care-giving (ex: care for addictions or refugees). Altogether, GPs spend on average 5.8 h a week on these activities. One-hundred and twenty-three GPs (82%) were remunerated for at least one of their complementary engagements. Predictors of participation in a larger number of complementary activities were working in a rural area (IRR 1.29, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.57) and having a higher weekly workload (IRR 1.01 for each additional hour, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.02).
The vast majority of GPs engage in activities beyond their standard clinic tasks and they are typically reimbursed. GPs in rural areas and those who work more hours per week are more likely to engage in complementary activities.
Mots-clé
Adult, Community Health Services, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, General Practitioners/supply & distribution, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Education as Topic, Physician's Role, Poisson Distribution, Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data, Rural Health Services, Switzerland, Community medicine, Complementary activities, Cross-sectional, Primary care, Rural area
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
12/05/2018 10:02
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:31
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