Idiosyncratic evolution of maternal effects in response to juvenile malnutrition in Drosophila.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_380E8600D809.P001.pdf (268.59 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_380E8600D809
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Idiosyncratic evolution of maternal effects in response to juvenile malnutrition in Drosophila.
Périodique
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Vijendravarma R.K., Kawecki T.J.
ISSN
1420-9101 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1010-061X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
28
Numéro
4
Pages
876-884
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Maternal effects often affect fitness traits, but there is little experimental evidence pertaining to their contribution to response to selection imposed by novel environments. We studied the evolution of maternal effects in Drosophila populations selected for tolerance to chronic larval malnutrition. To this end, we performed pairwise reciprocal F1 crosses between six selected (malnutrition tolerant) populations and six unselected control populations and assessed the effect of cross direction on larval growth and developmental rate, adult weight and egg-to-adult viability expressed under the malnutrition regime. Each pair of reciprocal crosses revealed large maternal effects (possibly including cytoplasmic genetic effects) on at least one trait, but the magnitude, sign and which traits were affected varied among populations. Thus, maternal effects contributed significantly to the response to selection imposed by the malnutrition regime, but these changes were idiosyncratic, suggesting a rugged adaptive landscape. Furthermore, although the selected populations evolved both faster growth and higher viability, the maternal effects on growth rate and viability were negatively correlated across populations. Thus, genes mediating maternal effects can evolve to partially counteract the response to selection mediated by the effects of alleles on their own carriers' phenotype, and maternal effects may contribute to evolutionary trade-offs between components of offspring fitness.
Mots-clé
Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena, Animals, Biological Evolution, Body Weight/genetics, Crosses, Genetic, Drosophila/growth & development, Drosophila/physiology, Female, Larva/physiology, Male, Malnutrition, Stress, Physiological
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
20/04/2015 14:59
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:07
Données d'usage