Circadian distribution of rest/activity in narcoleptic and control dogs: assessment with ambulatory activity monitoring.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_33CA422840D6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Circadian distribution of rest/activity in narcoleptic and control dogs: assessment with ambulatory activity monitoring.
Périodique
Journal of Sleep Research
Auteur(s)
Nishino S., Tafti M., Sampathkumaran R., Dement W.C., Mignot E.
ISSN
0962-1105[print], 0962-1105[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
06/1997
Volume
6
Numéro
2
Pages
128-133
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Like human narcoleptics, narcoleptic dogs display cataplexy, fragmented sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness. Cataplexy in dogs can easily be quantified using a simple behavioural bioassay, the Food Elicited Cataplexy Test. In contrast, daytime sleepiness and fragmented sleep are more difficult to measure, as long-term, labour-intensive polygraphic recordings in surgically-implanted animals are needed. In the current study, 24-h rest/activity patterns in genetically narcoleptic, asymptomatic heterozygous and control Dobermans were compared using small sized ambulatory activity monitoring devices under 12-h light/dark conditions. Control and heterozygous dogs were found to be more active during the light period than during the dark period, thus demonstrating a clear 24-h rest/activity cycle. In contrast, narcoleptic dogs were relatively inactive during the light period and did not show a clear rest/activity pattern, a result similar to that of human narcoleptics. Considering the fact that narcoleptic dogs show shorter sleep latency and sleep significantly more during the daytime than control dogs, the decrease in activity in narcoleptic dogs during the daytime is most likely a reflection of increased daytime napping in these animals. Ambulatory activity monitoring may be a useful non-invasive method for future pharmacological and development studies in the narcoleptic canine model.
Mots-clé
Animals, Circadian Rhythm/physiology, Dogs, Locomotion/physiology, Narcolepsy/physiopathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 16:55
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 15:49
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