Emerging Role of Zika Virus in Adverse Fetal and Neonatal Outcomes.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_327A8827A086
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Emerging Role of Zika Virus in Adverse Fetal and Neonatal Outcomes.
Périodique
Clinical Microbiology Reviews
Auteur(s)
Panchaud A., Stojanov M., Ammerdorffer A., Vouga M., Baud D.
ISSN
1098-6618 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0893-8512
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Numéro
3
Pages
659-694
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; ReviewPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The rapid spread of the Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas and its potential association with thousands of suspected cases of microcephaly in Brazil and higher rates of Guillain-Barré syndrome meet the conditions for a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, as stated by the World Health Organization in February 2016. Two months later, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that the current available evidence supports the existence of a causal relationship between prenatal Zika virus infection and microcephaly and other serious brain anomalies. Microcephaly can be caused by several factors, and its clinical course and prognosis are difficult to predict. Other pathogens with proven teratogenicity have been identified long before the current ZIKV epidemic. Despite the growing number of cases with maternal signs of infection and/or presence of ZIKV in tissues of affected newborns or fetuses, it is currently difficult to assess the magnitude of increase of microcephaly prevalence in Brazil, as well as the role of other factors in the development of congenital neurological conditions. Meanwhile, health agencies and medical organizations have issued cautious guidelines advising health care practitioners and expectant couples traveling to, returning from, or living in affected areas. Analogous to dengue virus (DENV) epidemics, ZIKV has the potential to become endemic in all countries infested by Aedes mosquitoes, while new mutations could impact viral replication in humans, leading to increased virulence and consequently heightened chances of viral transmission to additional naive mosquito vectors. Studies are urgently needed to answer the questions surrounding ZIKV and its role in congenital neurological conditions.
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
18/06/2016 18:46
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:18
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