Effect of increased lung volume on sleep disordered breathing in patients with sleep apnoea

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_320FD6089F21
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Effect of increased lung volume on sleep disordered breathing in patients with sleep apnoea
Périodique
Thorax
Auteur(s)
Heinzer  R. C., Stanchina  M. L., Malhotra  A., Jordan  A. S., Patel  S. R., Lo  Y. L., Wellman  A., Schory  K., Dover  L., White  D. P.
ISSN
0040-6376 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2006
Volume
61
Numéro
5
Pages
435-9
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: May
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that changes in lung volume influence upper airway size and resistance, particularly in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) requirements decrease when the lung volume is increased. We sought to determine the effect of a constant lung volume increase on sleep disordered breathing during non-REM sleep. METHODS: Twelve subjects with OSA were studied during non-REM sleep in a rigid head-out shell equipped with a positive/negative pressure attachment for manipulation of extrathoracic pressure. The increase in lung volume due to CPAP (at a therapeutic level) was determined with four magnetometer coils placed on the chest wall and abdomen. CPAP was then stopped and the subjects were studied for 1 hour in three conditions (in random order): (1) no treatment (baseline); (2) at "CPAP lung volume", with the increased lung volume being reproduced by negative extrathoracic pressure alone (lung volume 1, LV1); and (3) 500 ml above the CPAP lung volume(lung volume 2, LV2). RESULTS: The mean (SE) apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) for baseline, LV1, and LV2, respectively, was 62.3 (10.2), 37.2 (5.0), and 31.2 (6.7) events per hour (p = 0.009); the 3% oxygen desaturation index was 43.0 (10.1), 16.1 (5.4), and 12.3 (5.3) events per hour (p = 0.002); and the mean oxygen saturation was 95.4 (0.3)%, 96.0 (0.2)%, 96.3 (0.3)%, respectively (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: An increase in lung volume causes a substantial decrease in sleep disordered breathing in patients with OSA during non-REM sleep.
Mots-clé
Adult Analysis of Variance *Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Female Humans Lung Volume Measurements Male Middle Aged Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/physiopathology/*therapy Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 10:45
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:17
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