Association of genetic risk scores with body mass index in Swiss psychiatric cohorts.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_3012FE323A7B.P001.pdf (2432.83 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_3012FE323A7B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Association of genetic risk scores with body mass index in Swiss psychiatric cohorts.
Périodique
Pharmacogenetics and Genomics
Auteur(s)
Saigi-Morgui N., Vandenberghe F., Delacrétaz A., Quteineh L., Gholamrezaee M., Aubry J.M., von Gunten A., Kutalik Z., Conus P., Eap C.B.
ISSN
1744-6880 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1744-6872
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
26
Numéro
5
Pages
208-217
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Weight gain is associated with psychiatric disorders and/or with psychotropic drug treatments. We analyzed in three psychiatric cohorts under psychotropic treatment the association of weighted genetic risk scores (w-GRSs) with BMI by integrating BMI-related polymorphisms from the candidate-gene approach and Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS).
MATERIALS AND METHODS: w-GRS of 32 polymorphisms associated previously with BMI in general population GWAS and 20 polymorphisms associated with antipsychotics-induced weight gain were investigated in three independent psychiatric samples.
RESULTS: w-GRS of 32 polymorphisms were significantly associated with BMI in the psychiatric sample 1 (n=425) and were replicated in another sample (n=177). Those at the percentile 95 (p95) of the score had 2.26 and 2.99 kg/m higher predicted BMI compared with individuals at the percentile 5 (p5) in sample 1 and in sample 3 (P=0.009 and 0.04, respectively). When combining all samples together (n=750), a significant difference of 1.89 kg/m predicted BMI was found between p95 and p5 individuals at 12 months of treatment. Stronger associations were found among men (difference: 2.91 kg/m of predicted BMI between p95 and p5, P=0.0002), whereas no association was found among women. w-GRS of 20 polymorphisms was not associated with BMI. The w-GRS of 52 polymorphisms and the clinical variables (age, sex, treatment) explained 1.99 and 3.15%, respectively, of BMI variability.
CONCLUSION: The present study replicated in psychiatric cohorts previously identified BMI risk variants obtained in GWAS analyses from population-based samples. Sex-specific analysis should be considered in further analysis.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
07/06/2016 8:26
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:14
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