Testing Local Adaptation in a Natural Great Tit-Malaria System: An Experimental Approach.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_2FEF176D421D.P001.pdf (2177.93 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2FEF176D421D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Testing Local Adaptation in a Natural Great Tit-Malaria System: An Experimental Approach.
Périodique
Plos One
Auteur(s)
Jenkins T., Delhaye J., Christe P.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Numéro
11
Pages
e0141391
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Finding out whether Plasmodium spp. are coevolving with their vertebrate hosts is of both theoretical and applied interest and can influence our understanding of the effects and dynamics of malaria infection. In this study, we tested for local adaptation as a signature of coevolution between malaria blood parasites, Plasmodium spp. and its host, the great tit, Parus major. We conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment of birds in the field, where we exposed birds from two populations to Plasmodium parasites. This experimental set-up also provided a unique opportunity to study the natural history of malaria infection in the wild and to assess the effects of primary malaria infection on juvenile birds. We present three main findings: i) there was no support for local adaptation; ii) there was a male-biased infection rate; iii) infection occurred towards the end of the summer and differed between sites. There were also site-specific effects of malaria infection on the hosts. Taken together, we present one of the few experimental studies of parasite-host local adaptation in a natural malaria system, and our results shed light on the effects of avian malaria infection in the wild.
Mots-clé
Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Anopheles/parasitology, Disease Susceptibility, Erythrocytes/parasitology, Female, Haemosporida/isolation & purification, Host-Parasite Interactions/physiology, Insect Vectors/parasitology, Insecticides, Malaria, Avian/parasitology, Malaria, Avian/transmission, Male, Models, Biological, Parasitemia/parasitology, Parasitemia/veterinary, Plasmodium/isolation & purification, Plasmodium/physiology, Sex Factors, Songbirds/blood, Songbirds/growth & development, Species Specificity, Time Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
11/11/2015 12:11
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:14
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