Effects of brood size manipulation and common origin on phenotype and telomere length in nestling collared flycatchers.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2F2AA6044528
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Effects of brood size manipulation and common origin on phenotype and telomere length in nestling collared flycatchers.
Périodique
BMC Ecology
Auteur(s)
Voillemot M., Hine K., Zahn S., Criscuolo F., Gustafsson L., Doligez B., Bize P.
ISSN
1472-6785 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1472-6785
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Numéro
1
Pages
17
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Evidence is accumulating that telomere length is a good predictor of life expectancy, especially early in life, thus calling for determining the factors that affect telomere length at this stage. Here, we investigated the relative influence of early growth conditions and origin (genetics and early maternal effects) on telomere length of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) at fledging. We experimentally transferred hatchlings among brood triplets to create reduced, control (i.e. unchanged final nestling number) and enlarged broods.
RESULTS: Although our treatment significantly affected body mass at fledging, we found no evidence that increased sibling competition affected nestling tarsus length and telomere length. However, mixed models showed that brood triplets explained a significant part of the variance in body mass (18%) and telomere length (19%), but not tarsus length (13%), emphasizing that unmanipulated early environmental factors influenced telomere length. These models also revealed low, but significant, heritability of telomere length (h(2) = 0.09). For comparison, the heritability of nestling body mass and tarsus length was 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, which was in the range of previously published estimates for those two traits in this species.
CONCLUSION: Those findings in a wild bird population demonstrate that telomere length at the end of the growth period is weakly, but significantly, determined by genetic and/or maternal factors taking place before hatching. However, we found no evidence that the brood size manipulation experiment, and by extension the early growth conditions, influenced nestling telomere length. The weak heritability of telomere length suggests a close association with fitness in natural populations.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
13/08/2012 15:13
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:13
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