Analysis of residual content of used syringes collected from low threshold facilities in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Revised_Paper_Lefrancois_2016.pdf (524.19 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2F28B73FE364
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Analysis of residual content of used syringes collected from low threshold facilities in Lausanne, Switzerland.
Périodique
Forensic science international
Auteur(s)
Lefrançois E., Esseiva P., Gervasoni J.P., Lucia S., Zobel F., Augsburger M.
ISSN
1872-6283 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0379-0738
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
266
Pages
534-540
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
For the first time in Switzerland, an analysis of residual contents from used syringes collected from low threshold facilities was performed. This preliminary study is part of a wider project aiming to understand patterns of injecting drug use over time.
Among the 100,000 syringes exchanged annually by the ABS foundation (Accueil Bas Seuil), 113 were collected following a purposive sampling method and analysed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS).
Four syringes (4% of the sample population) contained no substances take into consideration the limit of the method. Cocaine was the most commonly observed compound and was detected in 77 syringes (68%), whilst users reported syringes with cocaine among those analysed in this study. Heroin was detected in 49 syringes (43%) and reported by 53 users returning syringes; midazolam was detected in 31 syringes (27%) and reported as the medicine Dormicum(®) in 22 occurrences. No new or unusual illicit drug was detected in the sample.
The results show the presence of cocaine in more than half of the sample, an absence of new or unusual illicit drugs, as well as very few traces of methadone, which suggests that this substitution drug is rarely injected. This preliminary study also demonstrates the potential of this developed methodology for monitoring purposes. An ongoing and more systematic approach could allow to detect modifications in drug use patterns among the target population as well as the appearance of new and hazardous substances. Such systematic and timely results could allow an adaptation of harm reduction interventions.

Mots-clé
Crime, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Harm Reduction, Humans, Needle-Exchange Programs, Reproducibility of Results, Street Drugs/chemistry, Substance Abuse Detection, Substance Abuse, Intravenous/prevention & control, Surveys and Questionnaires, Switzerland, Syringes, GC–MS, Harm reduction, Illicit drugs, Injection drug users (IDUs), Low threshold facilities (LTFs), Needle exchange programs
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
17/08/2016 13:47
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 16:33
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