Cost-efficient production of in vitro Rhizophagus irregularis.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2DD31DD6050B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Cost-efficient production of in vitro Rhizophagus irregularis.
Périodique
Mycorrhiza
Auteur(s)
Rosikiewicz P., Bonvin J., Sanders I.R.
ISSN
1432-1890 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0940-6360
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
07/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
5
Pages
477-486
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
One of the bottlenecks in mycorrhiza research is that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have to be cultivated with host plant roots. Some AMF species, such as Rhizophagus irregularis, can be grown in vitro on dual-compartment plates, where fungal material can be harvested from a fungus-only compartment. Plant roots often grow into this fungus compartment, and regular root trimming is required if the fungal material needs to be free of traces of plant material. Trimming also increases unwanted contamination by other microorganisms. We compared 22 different culture types and conditions to a widely used dual-compartment culture system that we refer to as the "standard system." We found two modified culture systems that allowed high spore production and low rates of contamination. We then compared the two modified culture systems with the standard system in more detail. In the two modified culture systems versus the standard system, a comparable number of spores were produced per plate, the necessity for root trimming was reduced, and there was significantly diminished contamination in the fungal compartment. A cost analysis showed that both modified culture systems were more economic than the standard culture system for the production of the same number of non-contaminated spores. The two modified culture systems provide an economic alternative for the production of contaminant-free fungal material which is ideal for studies requiring AMF DNA or RNA for genetics, genomics, and transcriptomic studies or for studies requiring relatively large amounts of fungal material for greenhouse experiments.

Mots-clé
Glomeromycota/growth & development, Microbiological Techniques, Mycorrhizae/growth & development, Plant Roots/microbiology, Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Inoculum production, Rhizophagus irregularis, Root-organ culture
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
28/02/2017 20:37
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 16:28
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