Reducing the risk of hepatitis B virus transfusion-transmitted infection.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_2BEA8B2579A9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Reducing the risk of hepatitis B virus transfusion-transmitted infection.
Périodique
Journal of Blood Medicine
Auteur(s)
Niederhauser C.
ISSN
1179-2736 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1179-2736
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Volume
2
Pages
91-102
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish; pdf : Review
Résumé
Before 1970, approximately 6% of multi-transfused recipients acquired a transfusion-transmitted Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The safety improvements since then have been tremendous. From a level of a few infections per 1000 donations, the risk today, depending on the screening algorithm and additional measurements performed, has decreased to around 1:500,000 to 1:1,000,000, an improvement greater than 1000-fold compared to 50 years ago. This enormous gain in safety has been achieved through many factors, including development of increasingly more sensitive Hepatitis B antigen (HBsAg) assays; the adoption in some countries of hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) screening; an improved donor selection procedure; HBV vaccination programs; and finally the introduction of HBV nucleic acid testing (NAT). Because there is a tendency in transfusion medicine to add one safety measure on top of another to approach the ultimate goal of zero risks, costs become increasingly a matter of debate. It is obvious that any new measure in addition to existing methods or measures will have very poor cost effectiveness. Therefore each country needs to perform its own calculation based on the country's own epidemiology, resources, political and public awareness of the risks, in order to choose the correct and most cost-efficient measures. Ideally, each country would make decisions regarding implementation of additional blood safety measures in the context of both the perceived benefit and the allocation of overall health care resources.
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
09/11/2014 16:51
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 16:22
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