Sex- and melanism-specific variations in the oxidative status of adult tawny owls in response to manipulated reproductive effort.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2A5747C57185
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sex- and melanism-specific variations in the oxidative status of adult tawny owls in response to manipulated reproductive effort.
Périodique
The Journal of experimental biology
Auteur(s)
Emaresi G., Henry I., Gonzalez E., Roulin A., Bize P.
ISSN
1477-9145 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0022-0949
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
219
Numéro
Pt 1
Pages
73-79
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Oxidative stress, determined by the balance between the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defences, is hypothesized to play an important role in shaping the cost of reproduction and life history trade-offs. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated reproductive effort in 94 breeding pairs of tawny owls (Strix aluco) to investigate the sex- and melanism-specific effects on markers of oxidative stress in red blood cells (RBCs). This colour polymorphic bird species shows sex-specific division of labour and melanism-specific history strategies. Brood sizes at hatching were experimentally enlarged or reduced to increase or decrease reproductive effort, respectively. We obtained an integrative measure of the oxidative balance by measuring ROS production by RBCs, intracellular antioxidant glutathione levels and membrane resistance to ROS. We found that light melanic males (the sex undertaking offspring food provisioning) produced more ROS than darker conspecifics, but only when rearing an enlarged brood. In both sexes, light melanic individuals had also a larger pool of intracellular antioxidant glutathione than darker owls under relaxed reproductive conditions (i.e. reduced brood), but not when investing substantial effort in current reproduction (enlarged brood). Finally, resistance to oxidative stress was differently affected by the brood size manipulation experiment in males and females independently of their plumage coloration. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that reproductive effort can alter the oxidative balance in a sex- and colour-specific way. This further emphasizes the close link between melanin-based coloration and life history strategies.

Mots-clé
Animals, Antioxidants/metabolism, Clutch Size, Erythrocytes/chemistry, Feathers/physiology, Female, Glutathione/metabolism, Male, Melanins/chemistry, Oxidative Stress, Pigmentation/physiology, Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism, Reproduction, Sex Factors, Strigiformes/physiology
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
28/10/2015 8:08
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:10
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