Latent Class Analysis of Gambling Activities in a Sample of Young Swiss Men: Association with Gambling Problems, Substance Use Outcomes, Personality Traits and Coping Strategies.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 5_25929440_Postprint.pdf (1462.12 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_27434F3417F5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Latent Class Analysis of Gambling Activities in a Sample of Young Swiss Men: Association with Gambling Problems, Substance Use Outcomes, Personality Traits and Coping Strategies.
Périodique
Journal of gambling studies
Auteur(s)
Studer J., Baggio S., Mohler-Kuo M., Simon O., Daeppen J.B., Gmel G.
ISSN
1573-3602 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1050-5350
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
06/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Numéro
2
Pages
421-440
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The study aimed to identify different patterns of gambling activities (PGAs) and to investigate how PGAs differed in gambling problems, substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies. A representative sample of 4989 young Swiss males completed a questionnaire assessing seven distinct gambling activities, gambling problems, substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies. PGAs were identified using latent class analysis (LCA). Differences between PGAs in gambling and substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies were tested. LCA identified six different PGAs. With regard to gambling and substance use outcomes, the three most problematic PGAs were extensive gamblers, followed by private gamblers, and electronic lottery and casino gamblers, respectively. By contrast, the three least detrimental PGAs were rare or non-gamblers, lottery only gamblers and casino gamblers. With regard to personality traits, compared with rare or non-gamblers, private and casino gamblers reported higher levels of sensation seeking. Electronic lottery and casino gamblers, private gamblers and extensive gamblers had higher levels of aggression-hostility. Extensive and casino gamblers reported higher levels of sociability, whereas casino gamblers reported lower levels of anxiety-neuroticism. Extensive gamblers used more maladaptive and less adaptive coping strategies than other groups. Results suggest that gambling is not a homogeneous activity since different types of gamblers exist according to the PGA they are engaged in. Extensive gamblers, electronic and casino gamblers and private gamblers may have the most problematic PGAs. Personality traits and coping skills may predispose individuals to PGAs associated with more or less negative outcomes.

Mots-clé
Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology, Behavior, Addictive/psychology, Comorbidity, Female, Gambling/epidemiology, Gambling/psychology, Humans, Male, Personality, Risk Factors, Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology, Substance-Related Disorders/psychology, Surveys and Questionnaires, Sweden, Young Adult
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
03/06/2015 11:21
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:06
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