Sex-related and non-sex-related comorbidity subtypes of tic disorders: a latent class approach.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_26C47BF884EE
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sex-related and non-sex-related comorbidity subtypes of tic disorders: a latent class approach.
Périodique
European Journal of Neurology : the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Auteur(s)
Rodgers S., Müller M., Kawohl W., Knöpfli D., Rössler W., Castelao E., Preisig M., Ajdacic-Gross V.
ISSN
1468-1331 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1351-5101
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
21
Numéro
5
Pages
700-e45
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Recent evidence suggests that there may be more than one Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS)/tic disorder phenotype. However, little is known about the common patterns of these GTS/tic disorder-related comorbidities. In addition, sex-specific phenomenological data of GTS/tic disorder-affected adults are rare. Therefore, this community-based study used latent class analyses (LCA) to investigate sex-related and non-sex-related subtypes of GTS/tic disorders and their most common comorbidities.
METHODS: The data were drawn from the PsyCoLaus study (n = 3691), a population-based survey conducted in Lausanne, Switzerland. LCA were performed on the data of 80 subjects manifesting motor/vocal tics during their childhood/adolescence. Comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, depressive, phobia and panic symptoms/syndromes comprised the selected indicators. The resultant classes were characterized by psychosocial correlates.
RESULTS: In LCA, four latent classes provided the best fit to the data. We identified two male-related classes. The first class exhibited both ADHD and depression. The second class comprised males with only depression. Class three was a female-related class depicting obsessive thoughts/compulsive acts, phobias and panic attacks. This class manifested high psychosocial impairment. Class four had a balanced sex proportion and comorbid symptoms/syndromes such as phobias and panic attacks. The complementary occurrence of comorbid obsessive thoughts/compulsive acts and ADHD impulsivity was remarkable.
CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study applying LCA to community data of GTS symptoms/tic disorder-affected persons. Our findings support the utility of differentiating GTS/tic disorder subphenotypes on the basis of comorbid syndromes.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
11/04/2014 14:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:05
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