Sensory dominance and multisensory integration as screening tools in aging.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Murray-2018-ScientificReports.pdf (1458.40 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_24C1B8E4E627
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sensory dominance and multisensory integration as screening tools in aging.
Périodique
Scientific reports
Auteur(s)
Murray M.M., Eardley A.F., Edginton T., Oyekan R., Smyth E., Matusz P.J.
ISSN
2045-2322 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-2322
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/06/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Numéro
1
Pages
8901
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Evaluation Studies ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Multisensory information typically confers neural and behavioural advantages over unisensory information. We used a simple audio-visual detection task to compare healthy young (HY), healthy older (HO) and mild-cognitive impairment (MCI) individuals. Neuropsychological tests assessed individuals' learning and memory impairments. First, we provide much-needed clarification regarding the presence of enhanced multisensory benefits in both healthily and abnormally aging individuals. The pattern of sensory dominance shifted with healthy and abnormal aging to favour a propensity of auditory-dominant behaviour (i.e., detecting sounds faster than flashes). Notably, multisensory benefits were larger only in healthy older than younger individuals who were also visually-dominant. Second, we demonstrate that the multisensory detection task offers benefits as a time- and resource-economic MCI screening tool. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated that MCI diagnosis could be reliably achieved based on the combination of indices of multisensory integration together with indices of sensory dominance. Our findings showcase the importance of sensory profiles in determining multisensory benefits in healthy and abnormal aging. Crucially, our findings open an exciting possibility for multisensory detection tasks to be used as a cost-effective screening tool. These findings clarify relationships between multisensory and memory functions in aging, while offering new avenues for improved dementia diagnostics.
Mots-clé
Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging/pathology, Aging/physiology, Auditory Perception, Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis, Female, Humans, Male, Mass Screening/methods, Neuropsychological Tests, Photic Stimulation, ROC Curve, Visual Perception, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/06/2018 10:22
Dernière modification de la notice
14/10/2019 5:09
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