Why are some species older than others? A large-scale study of vertebrates.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 27142042_BIB_2203EF8F0317.pdf (642.29 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2203EF8F0317
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Why are some species older than others? A large-scale study of vertebrates.
Périodique
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Cattin L., Schuerch J., Salamin N., Dubey S.
ISSN
1471-2148 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2148
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
16
Numéro
1
Pages
90
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Strong variations are observed between and within taxonomic groups in the age of extant species and these differences can clarify factors that render species more vulnerable to extinction. Understanding the factors that influence the resilience of species is thus a key component of evolutionary biology, but it is also of prime importance in a context of climate change and for conservation in general. We explored the effect of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on the timing of the oldest diversification event in over 600 vertebrate species distributed worldwide. We used phylogenetic comparative methods to show that color polymorphism, latitude and reproduction (the latter through its interaction with latitude) affected the timing of the oldest diversification event within a species.
RESULTS: Species from higher latitudes tended to be younger, and colour-polymorphic species were older than monomorphic species. Mode of reproduction was important also, in that the age of oviparous species decreased with latitude, whereas no pattern was apparent for viviparous species. Organisms which have already persisted for a long time may be more likely to deal with future modifications of their environment.
CONCLUSIONS: Species that are colour polymorphic, viviparous, and/or live at low latitudes have exhibited resilience to past environmental changes, and hence may be better able to deal with current climate change.
Mots-clé
Animals, Biological Evolution, Body Size, Climate Change, Environment, Genetic Speciation, Phylogeny, Reproduction, Vertebrates/genetics
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
17/05/2016 18:47
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 15:42
Données d'usage