Go East for Better Honey Bee Health: Apis cerana Is Faster at Hygienic Behavior than A. mellifera.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_21905B620DDE
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Go East for Better Honey Bee Health: Apis cerana Is Faster at Hygienic Behavior than A. mellifera.
Périodique
PloS one
Auteur(s)
Lin Z., Page P., Li L., Qin Y., Zhang Y., Hu F., Neumann P., Zheng H., Dietemann V.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Numéro
9
Pages
e0162647
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
The poor health status of the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, compared to its Eastern counterpart, Apis cerana, is remarkable. This has been attributed to lower pathogen prevalence in A. cerana colonies and to their ability to survive infestations with the ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor. These properties have been linked to an enhanced removal of dead or unhealthy immature bees by adult workers in this species. Although such hygienic behavior is known to contribute to honey bee colony health, comparative data of A. mellifera and A. cerana in performing this task are scarce. Here, we compare for the first time the removal of freeze-killed brood in one population of each species and over two seasons in China. Our results show that A. cerana was significantly faster than A. mellifera at both opening cell caps and removing freeze-killed brood. The fast detection and removal of diseased brood is likely to limit the proliferation of pathogenic agents. Given our results can be generalized to the species level, a rapid hygienic response could contribute to the better health of A. cerana. Promoting the fast detection and removal of worker brood through adapted breeding programs could further improve the social immunity of A. mellifera colonies and contribute to a better health status of the Western honey bee worldwide.
Mots-clé
Animals, Bees/physiology, Behavior, Animal/physiology, Freezing, Health, Time Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/07/2018 9:06
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 6:08
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