Climate‐driven convergent evolution of plumage colour in a cosmopolitan bird

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_218B0E4B6AE8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Climate‐driven convergent evolution of plumage colour in a cosmopolitan bird
Périodique
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Auteur(s)
Romano A., Séchaud R., Hirzel A.H., Roulin A.
ISSN
1466-8238
ISSN-L
1466-822X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
28
Numéro
4
Pages
496–507
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Aim The investigation of phenotypic diversity across geographical gradients is pivotal to understanding the evolution and adaptive functions of alternative phenotypes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the polymorphism in ventral plumage colouration observed in the cosmopolitan common barn owl group is determined by climatic factors, such as temperature and rainfall, consistent with Gloger's and Bogert's biogeographical rules. Location World. Time period 1809-2017. Major taxa studied Tyto alba species complex. Methods We analysed the variation in heritable melanin-based plumage colour according to annual temperature and rainfall in 9,110 individuals of the cosmopolitan barn owl, with three distinct evolutionary lineages representing its entire distribution range: the Afro-European Tyto alba, occurring between Scandinavia and South Africa, the American Tyto furcata, found from southern Canada to Patagonia, and the Australasian Tyto javanica, living between the Himalayan Plateau and Tasmania. Results Although the geographical distribution of colour morphs is heterogeneous among the lineages, in all of them plumage colour becomes darker with increasing annual rainfall, indicating a convergent selection of darker morphs in humid habitats possibly to improve camouflage against the dark environment and/or to repel water more efficiently. Moreover, in T. alba and T. furcata, melanization increases at decreasing temperature, suggesting its possible role in thermoregulation. Discussion These findings provide convincing evidence of repeated evolution of similar body colouration patterns at a worldwide scale compatible with the main biogeographical rules, while emphasizing the possible role of melanin-based traits in animal adaptation to climate change.
Mots-clé
adaptive radiation, biogeographical rules, convergent evolution, cosmopolitan species, melanin colour, natural selection
Web of science
Création de la notice
20/03/2019 11:25
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:58
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