Do therapist behaviors differ with Hispanic youth? A brief look at within-session therapist behaviors and youth treatment response.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_21258F714F4C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Do therapist behaviors differ with Hispanic youth? A brief look at within-session therapist behaviors and youth treatment response.
Périodique
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors : Journal of the Society of Psychologists In Addictive Behaviors
Auteur(s)
Feldstein Ewing S.W., Gaume J., Ernst D.B., Rivera L., Houck J.M.
ISSN
1939-1501 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0893-164X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Numéro
3
Pages
779-786
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Brief addiction treatments, including motivational interviewing (MI), have shown promise with youth. One underexamined factor in this equation is the role of therapist behaviors. We therefore sought to assess whether and how therapist behaviors differ for Hispanic versus non-Hispanic youth and how that may be related to treatment outcome. With 80 substance-using adolescents (M age = 16 years; 65% male; 59% Hispanic; 41% non-Hispanic), we examined the relationship between youth ethnicity and therapist behaviors across two brief treatments (MI and alcohol/marijuana education [AME]). We then explored relationships to youth 3-month treatment response across four target outcomes: binge drinking days, alcohol-related problems, marijuana use days, and marijuana-related problems. In this study, therapists showed significantly more MI skills within the MI condition and more didactic skills in the AME condition. With respect to youth ethnicity, across both conditions (MI and AME), therapists used less MI skills with Hispanic youth. Contrary to expectations, therapists' use of MI skills was not connected to poorer outcomes for Hispanic youth across the board (e.g., for binge drinking days, marijuana use days, or marijuana-related problems). Rather, for Hispanic youth, therapists' use of lower MI skills was related only to poorer treatment outcomes in the context of alcohol-related problems. The observed relationships highlight the importance of investigating salient treatment interactions between therapist factors and youth ethnicity to guide improvements in youth treatment response.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, African Americans, Alcohol-Related Disorders/therapy, Binge Drinking/therapy, Case-Control Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Healthcare Disparities, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Marijuana Abuse/therapy, Marijuana Smoking/therapy, Motivational Interviewing/methods, Patient Education as Topic/methods, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Psychotherapeutic Processes, Psychotherapy, Brief/methods, Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
19/10/2015 13:53
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 14:44
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