An evidence map of psychosocial interventions for the earliest stages of bipolar disorder.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_1EC5D6EF1E9F.P001.pdf (527.37 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_1EC5D6EF1E9F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
An evidence map of psychosocial interventions for the earliest stages of bipolar disorder.
Périodique
The lancet. Psychiatry
Auteur(s)
Vallarino M., Henry C., Etain B., Gehue L.J., Macneil C., Scott E.M., Barbato A., Conus P., Hlastala S.A., Fristad M., Miklowitz D.J., Scott J.
ISSN
2215-0374 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2215-0366
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
06/2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
2
Numéro
6
Pages
548-563
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Article ; research-article Identifiant PubMed Central: PMC4629930
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder are three of the four most burdensome problems in people aged under 25 years. In psychosis and depression, psychological interventions are effective, low-risk, and high-benefit approaches for patients at high risk of first-episode or early-onset disorders. We review the use of psychological interventions for early-stage bipolar disorder in patients aged 15-25 years. Because previous systematic reviews had struggled to identify information about this emerging sphere of research, we used evidence mapping to help us identify the extent, distribution, and methodological quality of evidence because the gold standard approaches were only slightly informative or appropriate. This strategy identified 29 studies in three target groups: ten studies in populations at high risk for bipolar disorder, five studies in patients with a first episode, and 14 studies in patients with early-onset bipolar disorder. Of the 20 completed studies, eight studies were randomised trials, but only two had sample sizes of more than 100 individuals. The main interventions used were family, cognitive behavioural, and interpersonal therapies. Only behavioural family therapies were tested across all of our three target groups. Although the available interventions were well adapted to the level of maturity and social environment of young people, few interventions target specific developmental psychological or physiological processes (eg, ruminative response style or delayed sleep phase), or offer detailed strategies for the management of substance use or physical health.

Mots-clé
Bipolar Disorder/psychology, Bipolar Disorder/therapy, Early Intervention (Education), Humans, Psychotherapy/methods, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Pubmed
Création de la notice
25/07/2016 9:19
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 14:36
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