Insulin signaling is involved in the regulation of worker division of labor in honey bee colonies.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_1D45ACBA56A7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Insulin signaling is involved in the regulation of worker division of labor in honey bee colonies.
Périodique
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Auteur(s)
Ament S.A., Corona M., Pollock H.S., Robinson G.E.
ISSN
1091-6490[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2008
Volume
105
Numéro
11
Pages
4226-4231
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. - Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
It has been proposed that one route of behavioral evolution involves novel regulation of conserved genes. Age-related division of labor in honey bee colonies, a highly derived behavioral system, involves the performance of different feeding-related tasks by different groups of individuals. Older bees acquire the colony's food by foraging for nectar and pollen, and the younger "nurse" bees feed larvae processed foods. The transition from hive work to foraging has been shown to be socially regulated and associated both with decreases in abdominal lipid stores and with increases in brain expression of genes implicated in feeding behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we show that division of labor is influenced by a canonical regulator of food intake and energy balance in solitary species, the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway. Foragers had higher levels of IIS gene expression in the brain and abdomen than did nurses, despite their low lipid stores. These differences are likely nutritionally mediated because manipulations that induced low lipid stores in young bees also up-regulated these genes. Changes in IIS also causally influenced the timing of behavioral maturation: inhibition of the insulin-related target of rapamycin pathway delayed the onset of foraging in a seasonally dependent manner. In addition, pathway analyses of microarray data revealed that nurses and foragers differ in brain energy metabolism gene expression, but the differences are opposite predictions based on their insulin-signaling status. These results suggest that changes in the regulation of the IIS pathway are associated with social behavior.
Mots-clé
1-Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/metabolism, Animals, Bees/metabolism, Behavior, Animal/physiology, Brain/metabolism, DNA, Complementary/genetics, Gene Expression Regulation, Insulin/metabolism, Male, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Receptor, Insulin/metabolism, Receptors, Neuropeptide/genetics, Receptors, Neuropeptide/metabolism, Signal Transduction, Social Behavior
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
10/03/2008 11:37
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:53
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