Cumulative exposure estimates for polychlorinated biphenyls using a job-exposure matrix.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_1BD40BCC7EFE
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Cumulative exposure estimates for polychlorinated biphenyls using a job-exposure matrix.
Périodique
Chemosphere
Auteur(s)
Hopf N.B., Waters M.A., Ruder A.M.
ISSN
1879-1298 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0045-6535
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
06/2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
76
Numéro
2
Pages
185-193
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
PCB exposure has been associated with increased risk for cancer, neurological disease, and for birth defects in children exposed in utero. Because of the long half-lives of PCB congeners, they remain a public health problem in the United States 30 years after being banned. Workers (n=3569) at an Indiana capacitor manufacturing plant were exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from 1957 to 1977. The purpose of this work was to develop a period-specific job-exposure matrix (JEM) for a follow-up epidemiologic study investigating the increased risks for cancer previously observed in the cohort.
We used eight exposure determinants to estimate PCB exposures systematically. Work history, job description, capacitor production factors, PCB usage trends, and air sample data were used to develop the JEM in four steps: (1) all job titles (n=884) were assessed for exposure determinants, (2) jobs with similar exposure determinants were grouped, (3) for each job exposure category, exposure intensity (high-medium-low-background) and frequency (continuous-intermittent) were qualitatively rated separately for inhalation and dermal exposure, and (4) for each job exposure category, the product of intensity (based on air sampling data) and frequency (fraction of day exposed) was calculated. The JEM was then modified for two eras of different PCB exposure conditions.
The resulting JEM consists of inhalation and dermal exposure values for 19 job exposure categories.
The JEM showed an exposure-response trend associated with increased brain cancer mortality in the epidemiologic study.

Mots-clé
Brain Neoplasms/chemically induced, Brain Neoplasms/mortality, Cohort Studies, Electricity, Humans, Inhalation, Job Description, Occupational Exposure/analysis, Polychlorinated Biphenyls/toxicity
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
07/10/2011 12:55
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 14:31
Données d'usage