Effect of training on primary care residents' performance in brief alcohol intervention: a randomized controlled trial

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: serval:BIB_1A3AD9F4AE4A.P001 (153.62 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: Non spécifiée
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ID Serval
serval:BIB_1A3AD9F4AE4A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Effect of training on primary care residents' performance in brief alcohol intervention: a randomized controlled trial
Périodique
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Auteur(s)
Chossis  I., Lane  C., Gache  P., Michaud  P. A., Pecoud  A., Rollnick  S., Daeppen  J. B.
ISSN
1525-1497 (Electronic)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
08/2007
Volume
22
Numéro
8
Pages
1144-9
Notes
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Aug
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Brief alcohol interventions (BAI) reduce alcohol use and related problems in primary care patients with hazardous drinking behavior. The effectiveness of teaching BAI on the performance of primary care residents has not been fully evaluated. METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 26 primary care residents who were randomized to either an 8-hour, interactive BAI training workshop (intervention) or a lipid management workshop (control). During the 6-month period after training (i.e., from October 1, 2003 to March 30, 2004), 506 hazardous drinkers were identified in primary care, 260 of whom were included in the study. Patients were interviewed immediately and then 3 months after meeting with each resident to evaluate their perceptions of the BAI experience and to document drinking patterns. RESULTS: Patients reported that BAI trained residents: conducted more components of BAI than did controls (2.4 vs 1.5, p = .001); were more likely to explain safe drinking limits (27% vs 10%, p = .001) and provide feedback on patients' alcohol use (33% vs 21%, p = .03); and more often sought patient opinions on drinking limits (19% vs 6%, p = .02). No between-group differences were observed in patient drinking patterns or in use of 9 of the 12 BAI components. CONCLUSIONS: The BAI-trained residents did not put a majority of BAI components into practice, thus it is difficult to evaluate the influence of BAI on the reduction of alcohol use among hazardous drinkers.
Mots-clé
Adult Aged Alcohol Drinking/*prevention & control Alcoholism/*therapy Counseling/education Female Humans Hyperlipidemias/therapy Internal Medicine/*education *Internship and Residency Male Middle Aged *Primary Health Care
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
28/01/2008 11:58
Dernière modification de la notice
01/10/2019 6:17
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