Back to Gondwanaland: can ancient vicariance explain (some) Indian Ocean disjunct plant distributions?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_16AAB5C71C77
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Back to Gondwanaland: can ancient vicariance explain (some) Indian Ocean disjunct plant distributions?
Périodique
Biology Letters
Auteur(s)
Pirie M.D., Litsios G., Bellstedt D.U., Salamin N., Kissling J.
ISSN
1744-957X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1744-9561
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
11
Numéro
6
Pages
20150086
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Oceans, or other wide expanses of inhospitable environment, interrupt present day distributions of many plant groups. Using molecular dating techniques, generally incorporating fossil evidence, we can estimate when such distributions originated. Numerous dating analyses have recently precipitated a paradigm shift in the general explanations for the phenomenon, away from older geological causes, such as continental drift, in favour of more recent, long-distance dispersal (LDD). For example, the 'Gondwanan vicariance' scenario has been dismissed in various studies of Indian Ocean disjunct distributions. We used the gentian tribe Exaceae to reassess this scenario using molecular dating with minimum (fossil), maximum (geological), secondary (from wider analyses) and hypothesis-driven age constraints. Our results indicate that ancient vicariance cannot be ruled out as an explanation for the early origins of Exaceae across Africa, Madagascar and the Indian subcontinent unless a strong assumption is made about the maximum age of Gentianales. However, both the Gondwanan scenario and the available evidence suggest that there were also several, more recent, intercontinental dispersals during the diversification of the group.
Mots-clé
calibration, dating, Exaceae, long-distance dispersal, vicariance
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
10/08/2015 10:11
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:46
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