Bidirectional relationship between the body mass index and substance use in young men.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_162F7CEB4F88
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Bidirectional relationship between the body mass index and substance use in young men.
Périodique
Substance abuse
Auteur(s)
N'Goran A.A., Studer J., Deline S., Henchoz Y., Baggio S., Mohler-Kuo M., Daeppen J.B., Gmel G.
ISSN
1547-0164 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0889-7077
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
37
Numéro
1
Pages
190-196
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Obesity and substance use are major concern in young people. This study explored the bidirectional longitudinal relationships between the body mass index (BMI) of young men and their use of (1) 4 classes of nonmedical prescription drugs; (2) alcohol; (3) tobacco; and (4) cannabis.
Baseline and follow-up data from the Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors were used (N = 5007). A cross-lagged panel model, complemented by probit models as sensitivity analysis, was run to determine the bidirectional relationships between BMI and substance use. Alcohol was assessed using risky single-occasion drinking (RSOD); tobacco, using daily smoking; and cannabis, using hazardous cannabis use (defined as twice-weekly or more cannabis use). Nonmedical prescription drugs use (NMPDU) included opioid analgesics, sedatives/sleeping pills, anxiolytics, and stimulants.
Different associations were found between BMI and substance use. Only RSOD (β = -.053, P = .005) and NMPDU of anxiolytics (β = .040, P = .020) at baseline significantly predicted BMI at follow-up. Baseline RSOD predicted a lower BMI at follow-up, whereas baseline NMPDU of anxiolytics predicted higher BMI at follow-up. Furthermore, BMI at baseline significantly predicted daily smoking (β = .050, P = .007) and hazardous cannabis use (β = .058, P = .030).
These results suggest different associations between BMI and the use of various substances by young men. However, only RSOD and NMPDU of anxiolytics predicted BMI, whereas BMI predicted daily smoking and hazardous cannabis use.

Mots-clé
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology, Body Mass Index, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Marijuana Smoking/epidemiology, Models, Psychological, Prescription Drugs/adverse effects, Risk Factors, Smoking/epidemiology, Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology, Switzerland/epidemiology, Young Adult
Pubmed
Création de la notice
21/07/2015 16:00
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:45
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