Subcortical aphasia: a longitudinal PET study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_1600BD3B78AA
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Subcortical aphasia: a longitudinal PET study.
Périodique
Stroke
Auteur(s)
de Boissezon X., Démonet J.F., Puel M., Marie N., Raboyeau G., Albucher J.F., Chollet F., Cardebat D.
ISSN
1524-4628 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0039-2499
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2005
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
36
Numéro
7
Pages
1467-1473
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Very few neuroimaging studies have focused on follow-up of subcortical aphasia. Here, overt language production tasks were used to correlate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes and language performance in patients with vascular subcortical lesions.
METHODS: Seven aphasic patients were scanned twice with positron emission tomography (PET) at 1-year interval during a word-generation task. Using SPM2, Language-Rest contrast at PET1 was correlated to language performance and to time-lag from stroke. The same contrast was performed at PET2 and session effect (PET2-PET1) was correlated with performance improvement.
RESULTS: At PET1, correlation between rCBF and delay from stroke involved mainly ventral regions of the left temporal cortex and mesial frontal cortex. Correlations between rCBF and performance showed predominantly left dorsal regions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes, but also the left ventral temporal cortex. One year apart, language performance improved and rCBF increased in perisylvian regions bilaterally. Best performers at PET2 showed an increase of activity in left ventral temporal cortex as well as in right middle temporal gyrus.
CONCLUSIONS: On follow-up, expected language improvement and increase of activation in the classical language areas and their counterparts were observed. Moreover, all correlational analyses both at PET1 and on follow-up implicated the anterior part of the left inferior temporal gyrus, suggesting a disconnection between the superior and inferior parts of the left temporal cortex and a specific role for this region in lexical semantic processing.
Mots-clé
Adult, Aged, Aphasia, Broca/pathology, Aphasia, Broca/therapy, Aphasia, Wernicke/pathology, Aphasia, Wernicke/therapy, Brain/pathology, Brain Mapping, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Frontal Lobe/pathology, Humans, Language, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Positron-Emission Tomography/methods, Stroke/pathology, Stroke/therapy, Temporal Lobe/pathology, Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 19:45
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 14:55
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