Sex-specific changes in gene expression in response to estrogen pollution around the onset of sex differentiation in grayling (Salmonidae).

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Selmoni et al. 2019.pdf (813.87 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_146003703B65
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sex-specific changes in gene expression in response to estrogen pollution around the onset of sex differentiation in grayling (Salmonidae).
Périodique
BMC Genomics
Auteur(s)
Selmoni O.M., Maitre D., Roux J., Wilkins LGE, Marques da Cunha L., Vermeirssen ELM, Knörr S., Robinson-Rechavi M., Wedekind C.
ISSN
1471-2164 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2164
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
15/07/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Numéro
1
Pages
583
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
The synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a common estrogenic pollutant that has been suspected to affect the demography of river-dwelling salmonids. One possibility is that exposure to EE2 tips the balance during initial steps of sex differentiation, so that male genotypes show female-specific gene expression and gonad formation. Here we study EE2 effects on gene expression around the onset of sex differentiation in a population of European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) that suffers from sex ratio distortions. We exposed singly-raised embryos to one dose of 1 ng/L EE2, studied gene expression 10 days before hatching, at the day of hatching, and around the end of the yolk-sac stage, and related it to genetic sex (sdY genotype). We found that exposure to EE2 affects expression of a large number of genes, especially around hatching. These effects were strongly sex-dependent. We then raised fish for several months after hatching and found no evidence of sex reversal in the EE2-exposed fish. We conclude that ecologically relevant (i.e. low) levels of EE2 pollution do not cause sex reversal by simply tipping the balance at early stages of sex differentiation, but that they interfere with sex-specific gene expression.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
03/07/2019 13:37
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:43
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