Training General Practitioners to Detect Probable Mental Disorders in Young People During Health Risk Screening.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_12DFE5CD784F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Training General Practitioners to Detect Probable Mental Disorders in Young People During Health Risk Screening.
Périodique
The Journal of adolescent health
Auteur(s)
Ambresin A.E., Otjes C.P., Patton G.C., Sawyer S.M., Thuraisingam S., English D.R., Haller D.M., Sanci L.A.
ISSN
1879-1972 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1054-139X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
61
Numéro
3
Pages
302-309
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The purpose of the study is to investigate whether a training intervention increases general practitioners' (GPs) detection sensitivity for probable mental disorders in young people.
Forty general practices were randomized to an intervention (29 GPs) or comparison arm (49 GPs). Intervention GPs participated in 9 hours of interactive training on youth-friendly care, psychosocial health risk screening, and responding to risk-taking behavior with motivational interviewing approaches, followed by practice visits assisting with integration of screening processes and tools. Youth aged 14-24 years attending GPs underwent a computer-assisted telephone interview about their consultation and psychosocial health risks. Having a "probable mental disorder" was defined as either scoring high on Kessler's scale of psychological distress (K10) or self-perceived mental illness. Other definitions tested were high K10; self-perceived mental illness; and high K10 and self-perceived mental illness. Psychosocial health risk screening rates, detection sensitivity, and other accuracy parameters (specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value) were estimated.
GPs' detection sensitivity improved after the intervention if having probable mental disorder was defined as high K10 score and self-perceived mental illness (odds ratio: 2.81; 95% confidence interval: 1.23-6.42). There was no significant difference in sensitivity of GPs' detection for our preferred definition, high K10 or self-perceived mental illness (.37 in both; odds ratio: .93; 95% confidence interval: .47-1.83), and detection accuracy was comparable (specificity: .84 vs. .87, positive predictive values: .54 vs. .60, and negative predictive values: .72 vs. .72).
Improving recognition of mental disorder among young people attending primary care is likely to require a multifaceted approach targeting young people and GPs.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Family Practice/methods, Female, General Practitioners/education, Humans, Male, Mental Disorders/diagnosis, Middle Aged, Motivational Interviewing/methods, Primary Health Care, Risk-Taking, Young Adult, Adolescents, General practitioner, Mental disorder, Perceiving mental illness, Primary care, Psychosocial health risk screening, Universal intervention, Young people
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
22/06/2017 19:58
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:41
Données d'usage