Obstructive sleep apnoea as a risk factor for incident metabolic syndrome: a joined Episono and HypnoLaus prospective cohorts study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_12D9B56A730F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Obstructive sleep apnoea as a risk factor for incident metabolic syndrome: a joined Episono and HypnoLaus prospective cohorts study.
Périodique
The European respiratory journal
Auteur(s)
Hirotsu C., Haba-Rubio J., Togeiro S.M., Marques-Vidal P., Drager L.F., Vollenweider P., Waeber G., Bittencourt L., Tufik S., Heinzer R.
ISSN
1399-3003 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0903-1936
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
52
Numéro
5
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are often associated, but whether a temporal relationship exists is unknown. We aimed to investigate the effect of OSA on the risk of developing MetS in the general population.A prospective study was conducted combining two population-based samples: Episono (Brazil) and HypnoLaus (Switzerland). MetS was assessed according to unified criteria. Polysomnography (PSG) was performed at baseline and follow-up in Episono, and at baseline in HypnoLaus. OSA was defined according to the apnoea-hypopnoea index as mild (≥5- <15 events h <sup>-1</sup> ) and moderate-to-severe (≥15 events·h <sup>-1</sup> ). We included 1853 participants (mean±sd age 52±13 years, 56% female) without MetS at baseline.After mean±sd 6±1 years, 318 (17.2%) participants developed MetS. Moderate-to-severe OSA was independently associated with incident MetS (OR 2.58, 95% CI 1.61-4.11) and increased the number of MetS components from baseline to follow-up through mediation of the percentage of time with arterial oxygen saturation <90%. Subset analysis in Episono confirmed that the increase in this parameter between baseline and follow-up PSGs represented a risk factor for incident MetS (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.04-1.95, for each 10% increase).OSA is independently associated with an increased risk of developing MetS through mediation of nocturnal hypoxaemia in the general population.
Mots-clé
Adult, Aged, Brazil/epidemiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Lipids/blood, Logistic Models, Male, Metabolic Syndrome/complications, Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Polysomnography, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/complications, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/epidemiology, Switzerland/epidemiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
16/10/2018 11:20
Dernière modification de la notice
18/09/2019 6:10
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