The impact of past direct-personal traumatic events on 12-month outcome in first episode psychotic mania: trauma and early psychotic mania.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_127D3A72622C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The impact of past direct-personal traumatic events on 12-month outcome in first episode psychotic mania: trauma and early psychotic mania.
Périodique
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Auteur(s)
Daglas R., Conus P., Cotton S.M., Macneil C.A., Hasty M.K., Kader L., Berk M., Hallam K.T.
ISSN
1440-1614 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0004-8674
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
48
Numéro
11
Pages
1017-1024
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Past traumatic events have been associated with poorer clinical outcomes in people with bipolar disorder. However, the impact of these events in the early stages of the illness remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether prior traumatic events were related to poorer outcomes 12 months following a first episode of psychotic mania.
METHODS: Traumatic events were retrospectively evaluated from patient files in a sample of 65 participants who had experienced first episode psychotic mania. Participants were aged between 15 and 28 years and were treated at a specialised early psychosis service. Clinical outcomes were measured by a variety of symptomatic and functioning scales at the 12-month time-point.
RESULTS: Direct-personal traumatic experiences prior to the onset of psychotic mania were reported by 48% of the sample. Participants with past direct-personal trauma had significantly higher symptoms of mania (p=0.02), depression (p=0.03) and psychopathology (p=0.01) 12 months following their first episode compared to participants without past direct-personal trauma, with medium to large effects observed. After adjusting for baseline scores, differences in global functioning (as measured by the Global Assessment of Functioning scale) were non-significant (p=0.05); however, participants with past direct-personal trauma had significantly poorer social and occupational functioning (p=0.04) at the 12-month assessment with medium effect.
CONCLUSIONS: Past direct-personal trauma may predict poorer symptomatic and functional outcomes after first episode psychotic mania. Limitations include that the findings represent individuals treated at a specialist early intervention centre for youth and the retrospective assessment of traumatic events may have been underestimated.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
17/02/2015 12:50
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:40
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