The effect of host social system on parasite population genetic structure: comparative population genetics of two ectoparasitic mites and their bat hosts.

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Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_10105F80FCBF.P001.pdf (1551.52 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_10105F80FCBF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The effect of host social system on parasite population genetic structure: comparative population genetics of two ectoparasitic mites and their bat hosts.
Périodique
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
van Schaik J., Kerth G., Bruyndonckx N., Christe P.
ISSN
1471-2148 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2148
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
14
Pages
18
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: The population genetic structure of a parasite, and consequently its ability to adapt to a given host, is strongly linked to its own life history as well as the life history of its host. While the effects of parasite life history on their population genetic structure have received some attention, the effect of host social system has remained largely unstudied. In this study, we investigated the population genetic structure of two closely related parasitic mite species (Spinturnix myoti and Spinturnix bechsteini) with very similar life histories. Their respective hosts, the greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis) and the Bechstein's bat (Myotis bechsteinii) have social systems that differ in several substantial features, such as group size, mating system and dispersal patterns.
RESULTS: We found that the two mite species have strongly differing population genetic structures. In S. myoti we found high levels of genetic diversity and very little pairwise differentiation, whereas in S. bechsteini we observed much less diversity, strongly differentiated populations and strong temporal turnover. These differences are likely to be the result of the differences in genetic drift and dispersal opportunities afforded to the two parasites by the different social systems of their hosts.
CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that host social system can strongly influence parasite population structure. As a result, the evolutionary potential of these two parasites with very similar life histories also differs, thereby affecting the risk and evolutionary pressure exerted by each parasite on its host.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
20/01/2014 16:22
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:36
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