Age and gender variations of sleep in subjects without sleep disorders.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_0E43B723E94E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Age and gender variations of sleep in subjects without sleep disorders.
Périodique
Annals of Medicine
Auteur(s)
Luca G., Haba Rubio J., Andries D., Tobback N., Vollenweider P., Waeber G., Marques Vidal P., Preisig M., Heinzer R., Tafti M.
ISSN
1365-2060 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0785-3890
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
47
Numéro
6
Pages
482-491
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Although sleep is a biomarker for general health and pathological conditions, its changes across age and gender are poorly understood.
METHODS: Subjective evaluation of sleep was assessed by questionnaires in 5,064 subjects, and 2,966 were considered without sleep disorders. Objective evaluation was performed by polysomnography in 2,160 subjects, and 1,147 were considered without sleep disorders. Only subjects without sleep disorders were included (aged 40-80 years).
RESULTS: Aging was strongly associated with morning preference. Older subjects, especially women, complained less about sleepiness, and pathological sleepiness was significantly lower than in younger subjects. Self-reported sleep quality and daytime functioning improved with aging. Sleep latency increased with age in women, while sleep efficiency decreased with age in both genders. Deep slow-wave sleep decreased with age, but men were more affected. Spectral power densities within slow waves (< 5 Hz) and fast spindles (14-14.75 Hz) decreased, while theta-alpha (5-1 Hz) and beta (16.75-25 Hz) power in non-rapid eye movement sleep increased with aging. In REM sleep, aging was associated with a progressive decrease in delta (1.25-4.5 Hz) and increase in higher frequencies.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that sleep complaints should not be viewed as part of normal aging but should prompt the identification of underlying causes.
Mots-clé
Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, Electroencephalography, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polysomnography/instrumentation, Sex Factors, Sleep/physiology, Sleep Stages/physiology, Sleep, REM/physiology, Surveys and Questionnaires
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
07/08/2015 12:22
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:35
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