The impact of endothermy on the climatic niche evolution and the distribution of vertebrate diversity.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_0C415C45047B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The impact of endothermy on the climatic niche evolution and the distribution of vertebrate diversity.
Périodique
Nature ecology & evolution
Auteur(s)
Rolland J., Silvestro D., Schluter D., Guisan A., Broennimann O., Salamin N.
ISSN
2397-334X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2397-334X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
2
Numéro
3
Pages
459-464
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Understanding the mechanisms by which the abiotic and biotic requirements of species, or ecological niches, change over time is a central issue in evolutionary biology. Niche evolution is poorly understood at both the macroecological and macroevolutionary scales, as niches can shift over short periods of time but appear to change more slowly over longer timescales. Although reconstructing past niches has always been a major concern for palaeontologists and evolutionary biologists, only a few recent studies have successfully determined the factors that affect niche evolution. Here, we compare the evolution of climatic niches in four main groups of terrestrial vertebrates using a modelling approach integrating both palaeontological and neontological data, and large-scale datasets that contain information on the current distributions, phylogenetic relationships and fossil records for a total of 11,465 species. By reconstructing historical shifts in geographical ranges and climatic niches, we show that niche shifts are significantly faster in endotherms (birds and mammals) than in ectotherms (squamates and amphibians). We further demonstrate that the diversity patterns of the four clades are directly affected by the rate of niche evolution, with fewer latitudinal shifts in ectotherms.
Mots-clé
Animal Distribution, Animals, Biodiversity, Biological Evolution, Body Temperature Regulation, Climate, Ecosystem, Vertebrates/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
26/03/2018 13:57
Dernière modification de la notice
28/05/2019 6:11
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