Patient and physician gender concordance in preventive care in university primary care settings.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 5_25117521_Postprint.pdf (706.68 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_0B71B0AD7BB5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Patient and physician gender concordance in preventive care in university primary care settings.
Périodique
Preventive Medicine
Auteur(s)
Krähenmann-Müller S., Virgini V.S., Blum M.R., da Costa B.R., Collet T.H., Martin Y., Cornuz J., Zimmerli L., Gaspoz J.M., Bauer D.C., Kerr E.A., Aujesky D., Rodondi N.
ISSN
1096-0260 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0091-7435
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
67
Pages
242-247
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of preventive care according to physician and patient gender in a country with universal health care coverage.
METHODS: We assessed a retrospective cohort study of 1001 randomly selected patients aged 50-80years followed over 2years (2005-2006) in 4 Swiss university primary care settings (Basel, Geneva, Lausanne, Zürich). We used indicators derived from RAND's Quality Assessment Tools and examined percentages of recommended preventive care. Results were adjusted using hierarchical multivariate logistic regression models.
RESULTS: 1001 patients (44% women) were followed by 189 physicians (52% women). Female patients received less preventive care than male patients (65.2% vs. 72.1%, p<0.001). Female physicians provided significantly more preventive care than male physicians (p=0.01) to both female (66.7% vs. 63.6%) and male patients (73.4% vs. 70.7%). After multivariate adjustment, differences according to physician (p=0.02) and patient gender (p<0.001) remained statistically significant. Female physicians provided more recommended cancer screening than male physicians (78.4 vs. 71.9%, p=0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: In Swiss university primary care settings, female patients receive less preventive care than male patients, with female physicians providing more preventive care than male physicians. Greater attention should be paid to female patients in preventive care and to why female physicians tend to provide better preventive care.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
23/10/2014 18:47
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:33
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