Donor's and organ representations in liver, kidney, heart and lung transplantation : a qualitative longitudinal study

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_0B3330727A9F
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Poster: résume de manière illustrée et sur une page unique les résultats d'un projet de recherche. Les résumés de poster doivent être entrés sous "Abstract" et non "Poster".
Collection
Publications
Titre
Donor's and organ representations in liver, kidney, heart and lung transplantation : a qualitative longitudinal study
Titre de la conférence
Abstracts of the 14th Congress of the European Society for Organ Transplantation
Auteur(s)
Bosisio F., Bridy C., Pralong L., Szymanski J., Pascual M., Piot-Ziegler C.
Adresse
Paris, France, August 30-September 2, 2009
ISBN
0934-0874; 1432-2277
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
22
Série
Transplant International
Pages
225-225
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication type : Meeting Abstract
Résumé
Purpose: Organ transplantation is a biological and psychological challenge and graft acceptance is an important achievement for patients. Patients' concerns toward the deceased donor and the organ may contribute to this process.
Method: Forty-seven patients involved in heart (N=9), liver (N=8), lung (N=14) and kidney (N=16) transplantation participated in IRB-approved longitudinal semi-structured interviews: (T1) registered on the waiting-list, (T2) six months and (T3) twelve months after transplantation. Qualitative pattern analysis (QUAPA) was carried out on the verbatim transcripts and concerns about the donor and the organ were then analysed.
Results: - Donor's representation: At T1, patients were reluctant to talk about the donor: 27% expressed culpability and 19% accepted the clause of anonymity. At T2, intense emotions were associated with the reminiscing about the donor and 45% highlighted the generosity of his/her act. In addition, heart, lung and kidney recipients were concerned about the donor's identity: 42% challenged the clause of anonymity. Liver recipients complained about anonymity,
but could nevertheless cope with it. At T3, 47% of heart, lung and kidney recipients thought daily of the donor and 33% were still looking for information about him/her. Liver recipients rarely have thoughts about the donor.
- Organ representation:
At T1, organ descriptions were biomedical (49% of the interviewees) and more rarely, mainly heart candidates, referred to the symbolic meaning of the organ.
After transplantation (T2-T3), function was underlined. Acceptance and organ integration were associated with post-operative outcomes (23%) and psychological well-being (45%). Some patients (32%) inferred the donor's personality from the organ quality and felt privileged having received an organ in such a good state.
Conclusion: Donor's representations should be explored during the transplantation process as they play an important role in the psychological acceptance of the graft.
Web of science
Création de la notice
20/05/2009 9:31
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:32
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