Increasing respiratory dead space improves sleep disordered breathing and hypoxemia in patients with chronic mountain sickness

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_0A5CF87C08AE
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Increasing respiratory dead space improves sleep disordered breathing and hypoxemia in patients with chronic mountain sickness
Titre de la conférence
Joint annual meeting of the Swiss Society of Pneumology, Swiss Society of Pediatric Pneumology, Swiss Society for Thoracic Surgery
Auteur(s)
Rexhaj E., Lovis A., Jayet P-Y, Rimoldi S., Allemann Y, Heinzer R., Scherrer U., Sartori C.
Adresse
Lausanne, Switzerland, April 28-30, 2010
ISBN
1424-7860
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
140
Série
Swiss Medical Weekly
Pages
2
Langue
anglais
Notes
Meeting Abstract
Résumé
Background: Chronic mountain sickness (CMS), which is characterised by hypoxemia, erythrocytosis and pulmonary hypertension, is a major public health problem in high-altitude dwellers. The only existing treatment is descent to low altitude, an option that for social reasons almost never exists. Sleep disordered breathing may represent an underlying mechanism. We recently found that in mountaineers increasing the respiratory dead space markedly improves sleep disordered breathing. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of this procedure on sleep disordered breathing in patients with CMS.
Methods: In 10 male Bolivian high-altitude dwellers (mean ± SD age, 59 ± 9 y) suffering from CMS (haemoglobin >20 g/L) full night sleep recordings (Embletta, RespMed) were obtained in La Paz (3600 m). In random order, one night was spent with a 500 ml increase in dead space through a custom designed full face mask and the other night without it. Exclusion criteria were: secondary erythrocytosis, smoking, drug intake, acute infection, cardio- pulmonary or neurologic disease and travelling to low altitude in the preceding 6 months.
Results: The major new finding was that added dead space dramatically improved sleep disordered breathing in patients suffering from CMS. The apnea/hypopnea index decreased by >50% (from 34.5 ± 25.0 to 16.8 ± 14.9, P = 0.003), the oxygen desaturation index decreased from 46.2 ± 23.0 to 27.2 ± 20.0 (P = 0.0004) and hypopnea index from 28.8 ± 20.9 to 16.3 ± 14.0 (P = 0.01), whereas nocturnal oxygen saturation increased from 79.8 ± 3.6 to 80.9 ± 3.0% (P = 0.009). The procedure was easily accepted and well tolerated.
Conclusion: Here, we show for the very first time that an increase in respiratory dead space through a fitted mask dramatically improves nocturnal breathing in high-altitude dwellers suffering from CMS. We speculate that when used in the long-term, this procedure will improve erythrocytosis and pulmonary hypertension and offer an inexpensive and easily implementable treatment for this major public health problem.
Web of science
Création de la notice
06/05/2010 13:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:32
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