Migrants from Sub-Saharan Africa in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study: access to antiretroviral therapy, disease progression and survival.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_07F42BC58A21
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Migrants from Sub-Saharan Africa in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study: access to antiretroviral therapy, disease progression and survival.
Périodique
Aids
Auteur(s)
Staehelin C., Rickenbach M., Low N., Egger M., Ledergerber B., Hirschel B., D'Acremont V., Battegay M., Wagels T., Bernasconi E., Kopp C., Furrer H.
Collaborateur(s)
Swiss HIV Cohort Study
ISSN
0269-9370 (Print)
ISSN-L
0269-9370
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2003
Volume
17
Numéro
15
Pages
2237-2244
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: To examine the proportion of migrants from Sub-Saharan Africa entering the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) and to compare these participants with participants from Northwestern Europe for access to antiretroviral therapy, progression to AIDS and survival.
DESIGN: Prospective national cohort study of HIV-1-infected adults from seven HIV centres in Switzerland.
METHODS: Trends in the proportion of participants from Sub-Saharan Africa were followed in 11 872 HIV-infected adults entering the SHCS from 1984 to 2001. Survival methods were used to compare uptake of antiretroviral therapy, survival and progression to AIDS in the 2684 participants from Sub-Saharan Africa and Northwest Europe enrolled from 1997-2001.
RESULTS: There was a steady increase in the proportion of Sub-Saharan African participants over time, reaching 11.9% in 1997-2001. These participants were more likely to be younger, female, to have been infected by heterosexual intercourse and had lower CD4 cell counts at presentation. There were no differences between Sub-Saharan Africans and Northwest Europeans in uptake of triple antiretroviral therapy, progression to AIDS or survival up to 48 months after starting treatment. Tuberculosis was the most frequent AIDS-defining event in Sub-Saharan African patients.
CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence that access to potent antiretroviral therapy is influenced by geographic origin of participants. The prognosis of Sub-Saharan African patients on triple therapy is equivalent to that of Northwest European patients. Future research should address wider issues about access to specialist health services for HIV-infected people from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Mots-clé
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology, Adult, Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology, Age Factors, Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use, CD4 Lymphocyte Count/methods, Disease Progression, Emigration and Immigration, Europe/epidemiology, Female, HIV Infections/drug therapy, HIV Infections/epidemiology, HIV-1, Health Services Accessibility, Heterosexuality, Humans, Male, Prospective Studies, Sex Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
29/01/2008 9:52
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 13:29
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