Local and Widespread Slow Waves in Stable NREM Sleep: Evidence for Distinct Regulation Mechanisms.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 29970995_BIB_046661F9A5D7.pdf (2290.69 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_046661F9A5D7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Local and Widespread Slow Waves in Stable NREM Sleep: Evidence for Distinct Regulation Mechanisms.
Périodique
Frontiers in human neuroscience
Auteur(s)
Bernardi G., Siclari F., Handjaras G., Riedner B.A., Tononi G.
ISSN
1662-5161 (Print)
ISSN-L
1662-5161
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Pages
248
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Previous work showed that two types of slow waves are temporally dissociated during the transition to sleep: widespread, large and steep slow waves predominate early in the falling asleep period ( <i>type I</i> ), while smaller, more circumscribed slow waves become more prevalent later ( <i>type II</i> ). Here, we studied the possible occurrence of these two types of slow waves in stable non-REM (NREM) sleep and explored potential differences in their regulation. A heuristic approach based on slow wave synchronization efficiency was developed and applied to high-density electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings collected during consolidated NREM sleep to identify the potential <i>type I</i> and <i>type II</i> slow waves. Slow waves with characteristics compatible with those previously described for <i>type I</i> and <i>type II</i> were identified in stable NREM sleep. Importantly, these slow waves underwent opposite changes across the night, with only <i>type II</i> slow waves displaying a clear homeostatic regulation. In addition, we showed that the occurrence of <i>type I</i> slow waves was often followed by larger <i>type II slow waves</i> , whereas the occurrence of <i>type II</i> slow waves was usually followed by smaller <i>type I</i> waves. Finally, <i>type II</i> slow waves were associated with a relative increase in spindle activity, while <i>type I</i> slow waves triggered periods of high-frequency activity. Our results provide evidence for the existence of two distinct slow wave synchronization processes that underlie two different types of slow waves. These slow waves may have different functional roles and mark partially distinct "micro-states" of the sleeping brain.
Mots-clé
K-complex, NREM sleep, high-density EEG, slow wave activity, slow waves
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
09/07/2018 17:47
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:26
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