Evidence for mega-landslides as drivers of island colonization

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_02D5EBC00B46
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Evidence for mega-landslides as drivers of island colonization
Périodique
Journal of Biogeography
Auteur(s)
García-Olivares V., López H., Patiño J., Alvarez N., Machado A., Carracedo J.C., Soler V., Emerson B.C.
ISSN
1365-2699
ISSN-L
0305-0270
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
44
Numéro
5
Pages
1053-1064
Langue
anglais
Résumé
AimHow non-dispersive taxa colonize islands is generalized as being by wind, or rafting, with the implicit assumption that such events involve one (wind) or a few (rafting) individuals. However, because of the evolutionary time-scale for colonization events, the fit of individual species to a conceptual model of wind or rafting is difficult to assess. Here, we describe an alternative testable geological model for inter-island colonization that can result in larger effective founding population sizes than traditionally accepted colonization mechanisms. We then test for the fit of genetic data to this model using weevils from the Laparocerus tessellatus species complex.
LocationCanary Islands.
MethodsUsing a combination of geological data for the Canary Islands, and mtDNA data from a weevil radiation within the Canary Islands, we test three species-level predictions for mega-landslides as drivers of oceanic rafting between islands and subsequent speciation: (1) colonization should involve multiple female lineages, (2) founding lineages should have a common geographical origin, consistent with a mega-landslide event, and (3) colonization direction should be consistent with ocean currents.
ResultsBoth individual-level and population-level analyses support a mega-landslide event as the driver of colonization from the island of Tenerife to La Palma. At least four female lineages colonized La Palma from Tenerife, with the geographical range of ancestral sequences to these four lineages describing the limits of the La Orotava mega-landslide in Tenerife.
Main conclusionsIn the context of island biogeographical theory, mega-landslides may be an important driver of colonization, and subsequent lineage diversification. They provide a framework for hypothesis testing using genetic data from species, or closely related species, with ranges that encompass landslides and potential areas of colonization.
Mots-clé
biogeography, Canary Islands, equilibrium theory, invertebrate, landslide, long-distance dispersal, phylogeography, rafting
Web of science
Création de la notice
13/02/2017 14:40
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 13:19
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