Differences between calcium-stimulated and storage-induced erythrocyte-derived microvesicles.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_01FFD69B83F7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Differences between calcium-stimulated and storage-induced erythrocyte-derived microvesicles.
Périodique
Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Auteur(s)
Prudent M., Crettaz D., Delobel J., Seghatchian J., Tissot J.D., Lion N.
ISSN
1473-0502 (Print)
ISSN-L
1473-0502
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
53
Numéro
2
Pages
153-158
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Microvesicles (MVs), or microparticles, are a complex, dynamic and functional part of cells. Red blood cell (RBC)-derived MVs are naturally produced in vivo (during normal aging processes or in several diseases) as well as ex vivo during cold storage of RBCs, or in vitro by ATP depletion or treatment with Ca(2+) and calcium ionophore. All these MVs are equivalently classified according to their size and/or surface markers. Nevertheless, their content in proteins can differ and a few differences in terms of lipid raft proteins, notably stomatin and flotillin-2, have been reported. Based on two-dimensional gel electrophoreses, the present study highlights the differences between MVs induced during storage of RBCs (storage-MVs) and MVs stimulated by Ca(2+) entry (Ca-MVs). Upon treatment, Ca-MVs are formed following a clear recruitment of Ca(2+)-binding proteins (sorcin, grancalcin, PDCD6) and particularly annexins (4 and 5). Therefore, it emerges that different molecular pathways are available to produce similar MVs by disturbing the membrane/cytoskeleton interactions. Interestingly, these differences provide non-negligible pieces of information on the parent cells, and the mechanisms and modes of actions involved in the formation of MVs. In addition to biophysical characterization, protein analysis is important to classify these cellular corpuscles and evaluate their potential impacts in diseases or transfusion medicine.
Pubmed
Création de la notice
10/03/2016 10:34
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 13:16
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