Swiss clinical practice guidelines for skin cancer in organ transplant recipients.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 19680830.pdf (120.26 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_00C4BE73949B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Swiss clinical practice guidelines for skin cancer in organ transplant recipients.
Périodique
Swiss medical weekly
Auteur(s)
Hofbauer G.F., Anliker M., Arnold A., Binet I., Hunger R., Kempf W., Laffitte E., Lapointe A.C., Pascual M., Pelloni F., Serra A.
Collaborateur(s)
SGDV working group for organ transplant recipients
ISSN
1424-7860 (Print)
ISSN-L
0036-7672
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
25/07/2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
139
Numéro
29-30
Pages
407-415
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Practice Guideline
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Patients with a solid organ transplant have increased in numbers and in individual survival in Switzerland over the last decades. As a consequence of long-term immunosuppression, skin cancer in solid organ recipients (SOTRs) has been recognized as an important problem. Screening and education of potential SOTRs about prevention of sun damage and early recognition of skin cancer are important before transplantation. Once transplanted, SOTRs should be seen by a dermatologist yearly for repeat education as well as early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of skin cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (SCC) is the most frequent cancer in the setting of long-term immunosuppression. Sun protection by behaviour, clothing and daily sun screen application is the most effective prevention. Cumulative sun damage results in field cancerisation with numerous in-situ SCC such as actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease which should be treated proactively. Invasive SCC is cured by complete surgical excision. Early removal is the best precaution against potential metastases of SCC. Reduction of immunosuppression and switch to mTOR inhibitors and potentially, mycophenolate, may reduce the incidence of further SCC. Chemoprevention with the retinoid acitretin reduces the recurrence rate of SCC. The dermatological follow-up of SOTRs should be integrated into the comprehensive post-transplant care.

Mots-clé
Acitretin/therapeutic use, Anticarcinogenic Agents/therapeutic use, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/immunology, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/prevention & control, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Organ Transplantation/adverse effects, Skin Neoplasms/immunology, Skin Neoplasms/prevention & control, Sunscreening Agents/therapeutic use
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
09/02/2010 11:51
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:23
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